Category Archives: Deployment

Windows 7 x64 and TPM 2.0

If you are using Bitlocker, Configuration Manager 1610 or higher and get a piece of hardware that has TPM 2.0 there are a few more hurdles to get the device encrypted. Coretech has written notes from the field which states the two options going forward. Following their recommendation – lets go down the path of running a device with CSM (UEFI) enabled and installing Windows 7.

Make sure that the device is running in UEFI and is setup as expected. I will leave the actual configuration of BIOS / UEFI out of this – as any device with TPM 2.0 will most likely have a preconfigured settings that are optimal. If not, time to configure for UEFI (without Secure Boot).

UEFI Boot

Once that is completed – create a new group that has the intention to identify if we (if possible) booted with a legacy option (legacy PXE-boot, legacy USB stick etc etc). Validate that its not UEFI-booted and that we have a TPM 2.0 chip (and add a check that we are also intending to install Windows 7 x64).

image

Only two steps are required in the group – format the drive as GPT and then a restart to the boot-image. Suggested format:

image

Preprovision

Once we have ensured that the device is running in UEFI, and not legacy…, and since we all are running a newer ADK then 1511 – we should add three registry keys per Microsoft

Above configuration of the algorithms for Windows 10 (build 1511) is kept as REG_DWORDs under:

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\FVE

Operating System drives: EncryptionMethodWithXtsOs

Fixed Data drives: EncryptionMethodWithXtsFdv

Removable Data drives: EncryptionMethodWithXtsRdv

Hotfix

You can integrate the TPM 2.0 hotfix into the Windows 7, or simply install it after the WIM has been copied onto the machine. It should be installed before MBAM (or just bitlocker) is installed and starts handling the encryption

Task Sequence and shutdown (not reboot) a computer and continue

For some reason there is a requirement to do a computer shutdown (not restart) while running a task sequence, and once the computer starts again there is a need to continue running the task sequence where we left it.

How do you go about that? Let’st start…

image

We need two scripts, a task sequence with the ability to run one script and then to start a task sequence controlled restart.

For testing purposes a networkshare was used instead of leveraging a package, but in real-life and in production – all of the files can be placed in a package and executed from there.
This concept is tested within WinPE (using Winpeutil etc…), but you can most likely adapt it to a Windows installation.

Run Monitor

The ‘Run Monitor’ step will kick off a VB-Script that will start a powershell script – and then exit. Simple enough to start a script, and then allow the task sequence to continue with the next steps

image

VBScript
Runapp "powershell.exe","-noprofile -executionpolicy bypass -file " & GetScriptPatH() & "shutdown.ps1"

Private Function RunApp(AppPath,Switches)
Dim WShell
Dim RunString
Dim RetVal
Dim Success

On Error Resume Next

Set WShell=CreateObject("WScript.Shell")

RunString=Chr(34) &AppPath & Chr(34) & " " & Switches
Retval=WShell.Run(RunString,0,False)

RunApp=Retval

Set WShell=Nothing
End Function

Private Function GetScriptPath
GetScriptPath=Replace(WScript.ScriptFullName,WScript.ScriptName,"")
End Function

The powershell-script (shutdown.ps1) looks as follows;

  1. Create a TS Environment (so we can read variables)
  2. Verify if the variable _SMSTSBootStagePath is set
  3. If the drive-part is longer than a single-letter – we know that the boot-image is prepared and that the reboot countdown has started.
Powershell
$end =$true
write-output "start"

DO
{
start-sleep 2
Get-date
#Remove-Variable -name tsenv -Force -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
if (!$tsenv) {
try  {
$tsenv = New-Object -COMObject Microsoft.SMS.TSEnvironment
}
catch {
write-output "No TS started yet"
}
}
try  {
$bootpath = $tsenv.Value("_SMSTSBootStagePath") -split ":"
$tsenv.Value("_SMSTSBootStagePath")
if ($bootpath[0].length -gt 1) {
write-output "SMSTSBootStagePath prepped for reboot"
$end = $false
}
}
catch {
write-output "variable not set"
}

} While ($end -eq $true)

start-sleep 5

wpeutil shutdown

Restart

The restart step is fairly generic and you can configure it as you need. A thing to note is that the time-out needs to be higher than the start-sleep within the Powershell-script. As the purpose is to continue within WinPE – the step is configured to start to the boot-image.

image

VMware Horizon View Client–silent install

A few short notes on howto silently deploy the VMware Horizon View Client 4.0.1.

The latest release can be downloaded from VMware

 

File: ‘VMware-Horizon-Client-x86_64-4.0.1-3698521.exe’

Intent is to have no desktop-shortcut, enable all features, set a default server and have the user automatically login.

Parameters:

'/s /v"/qn 
REBOOT=ReallySuppress 
ADDLOCAL=ALL 
DESKTOP_SHORTCUT=0 
STARTMENU_SHORTCUT=1 
VDM_SERVER=vdi.site.com 
LOGINASCURRENTUSER_DEFAULT=1 
LOGINASCURRENTUSER_DISPLAY=1"'

Registry update:

'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432node\VMware, Inc.\VMware VDM\Client\Security'
Name: 'LogInAsCurrentUser' Value: 1 Type: DWORD

Uninstall Software

Based on the previous post handling the removal of the Ask software (the beloved add-on that everyone joyfully installs along with Java) a more developed script took form to handle any type of software.

Its based on the following borrowed pieces of code,

Get-LHSInstInstalledApp has been extended to also output the installationdate. Apart from that everything is as is from the original function

Convert-DateString has been used to convert the InstallationDate string to a date that can be used for calculations

ExitWithCode is a function that is simply used to end the script with an accumulated Exit Code from all uninstallations.

The script will accept the following parameters;

ApplicationName – a wild card search for the applications we want to remove.

PublisherName – we can validate that the right publisher have installed the application

InstallDateOlder – amount of days since the application was installed for us to remove it. Standard is 30

IgnoreInstallDate – True / False – we can choose to completely ignore when the application was installed

If the application is something other than an MSI – it will just report that a productcode is missing and not attempt the installation.

A log-file will be created in %WINDIR%\TEMP\APP_(yourappname)_Removal.LOG

Each uninstall will have a log-file written in %WINDIR%\TEMP with AP_UNINSTALL as prefix.

 

 

Running the script requires admin permissions

 

#========================================================================
# Created with: PowerShell ISE
# Created on: 2015-02-21 23:32
# Created by: Nicke Källén
# Organization: Applepie.se
# Filename: SCCM_Uninstall_Unused_Application
# Comment: Uninstalls an application (msi support only) based
# on Display Name in ARP, Publisher and how long ago
# it was installed
# Convert-DateString function
# http://www.powershellmagazine.com/2013/07/08/pstip-
# converting-a-string-to-a-system-datetime-object/
# Get-LHSInstalledApp - appended InstallDate to output
# https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/
# Get-Installed-Application-615fa73a
# Exit function
# http://weblogs.asp.net/soever/returning-an-exit-
# code-from-a-powershell-script
#========================================================================
param (
 [Parameter(Position=0,Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipeline=$True)]
 [string]$ApplicationName = "",
 [Parameter(Position=1,Mandatory=$false,ValueFromPipeline=$false)]
 [string]$PublisherName = "",
 [int]$InstallDateOlder = "30",
 [Parameter(mandatory=$false)]
 [bool]$IgnoreInstallDate=$false
 )

 function Convert-DateString ([String]$Date, [String[]]$Format)
{
 $result = New-Object DateTime

 $convertible = [DateTime]::TryParseExact(
 $Date,
 $Format,
 [System.Globalization.CultureInfo]::InvariantCulture,
 [System.Globalization.DateTimeStyles]::None,
 [ref]$result)

 if ($convertible) { $result }
}

Function Get-LHSInstalledApp {
<#
.SYNOPSIS
 List installed applications for local or remote computers.

.DESCRIPTION
 List installed applications for local or remote computers.

 List both 32-bit and 64-bit applications. Note that
 dotNet 4.0 Support for Powershell 2.0 needed.

 Output looks like this:
 -------------------------
 ComputerName : N104100
 AppID : {90120000-001A-0407-0000-0000000FF1CE}
 AppName : Microsoft Office Outlook MUI (German) 2007
 Publisher : Microsoft Corporation
 Version : 12.0.6612.1000
 Architecture : 32bit
 UninstallString : MsiExec.exe /X{90120000-001A-0407-0000-0000000FF1CE} 

.PARAMETER ComputerName
 Outputs applications for the named computer(s).
 If you omit this parameter, the local computer is assumed.

.PARAMETER AppID
 Outputs applications with the specified application ID.
 An application's appID is equivalent to its subkey name underneath the Uninstall registry key.
 For Windows Installer-based applications, this is the application's product code GUID
 (e.g. {3248F0A8-6813-11D6-A77B-00B0D0160060}). Wildcards are permitted.

.PARAMETER AppName
 Outputs applications with the specified application name.
 The AppName is the application's name as it appears in the
 Add/Remove Programs list. Wildcards are permitted.

.PARAMETER Publisher
 Outputs applications with the specified publisher name.
 Wildcards are permitted

.PARAMETER Version
 Outputs applications with the specified version.
 Wildcards are permitted.

.EXAMPLE
 PS C:\> Get-LHSInstalledApp

 This command outputs installed applications on the current computer.

.EXAMPLE
 PS C:\> Get-LHSInstalledApp | Select-Object AppName,Version | Sort-Object AppName

 This command outputs a sorted list of applications on the current computer.

.EXAMPLE
 PS C:\> Get-LHSInstalledApp wks1,wks2 -Publisher "*microsoft*"

 This command outputs all installed Microsoft applications on the named computers.
 * regular expression to match any characters.

.EXAMPLE
 PS C:\> Get-LHSInstalledApp wks1,wks2 -AppName "*Office 97*" 

 This command outputs any Application Name that match "Office 97" on the named computers.
 * regular expression to match any characters.

.EXAMPLE
 PS C:\> Get-Content ComputerList.txt | Get-LHSInstalledApp -AppID "{1A97CF67-FEBB-436E-BD64-431FFEF72EB8}" | Select-Object ComputerName

 This command outputs the computer names named in ComputerList.txt that have the specified application installed.

.EXAMPLE
 Get-LHSInstalledApp | Where-Object {-not ( $_.AppID -like "KB*") } |
 ConvertTo-CSV -Delimiter ';' -NoTypeInformation | Out-File -FilePath C:\temp\AppsInfo.csv
 Invoke-Item C:\temp\AppsInfo.csv

 Outputs all installed application except KB fixes to an CSV file and opens in Excel

.INPUTS
 System.String, you can pipe ComputerNames to this Function

.OUTPUTS
 PSObjects containing the following properties:

 ComputerName - computer where the application is installed
 AppID - the application's AppID
 AppName - the application's name
 Publisher - the application's publisher
 Version - the application's version
 Architecture - the application's architecture (32-bit or 64-bit)
 UninstallString - the application uninstall String

.NOTES
 More Info:
 ==========
 Why not using Get-WmiObject
 ---------------------------
 * Win32_Product
 At first glance, Win32_Product would appear to be one of those best solutions.
 The Win32_product class is not query optimized.
 Queries such as “select * from Win32_Product where (name like 'Sniffer%')”
 require WMI to use the MSI provider to enumerate all of the installed
 products and then parse the full list sequentially to handle the “where” clause:,

 * This process initiates a consistency check of packages installed,
 and then verifying and repairing the installations.
 * If you have an application that makes use of the Win32_Product class,
 you should contact the vendor to get an updated version that does not use this class.

 On Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, and newer operating systems, querying Win32_Product
 will trigger Windows Installer to perform a consistency check to verify the health of the
 application. This consistency check could cause a repair installation to occur. You can
 confirm this by checking the Windows Application Event log. You will see the following
 events each time the class is queried and for each product installed:

 Event ID: 1035
 Description: Windows Installer reconfigured the product. Product Name: <ProductName>.
 Product Version: <VersionNumber>. Product Language: <languageID>.
 Reconfiguration success or error status: 0.

 Event ID: 7035/7036
 Description: The Windows Installer service entered the running state.

 I would not recommend querying Win32_Product in your production environment unless you are in a maintenance window.

 * Win32Reg_AddRemovePrograms
 Win32Reg_AddRemovePrograms is not a standard Windows class.
 This WMI class is only loaded during the installation of an SMS/SCCM client.

 What is great about Win32Reg_AddRemovePrograms is that it contains similar properties and
 returns results noticeably quicker than Win32_Product.

 Using Registry:
 ----------------
 By default, if your process is running as a 32 bit process you will end up accessing the 32 bit "reflection" of
 the remote system. Therefore, registry keys like HKLM\Software will actually be mapped to HKLM\Software\Wow6432Node
 which gets very frustrating! You can access the 64 bit "reflection" via WMI, but personally I find that quite painful.

 Fortunately, in .NET 4, the registry class had some extra features added to it which allowed for a new
 overload "RegistryView". Therefore, you can now specify exactly which "reflection" of the registry
 you want to access and manipulate! No more headaches!

 In order to use this function, the Powershell instance must support .Net 4.0 or greater, which is fairly straightforward if you follow these instructions.
 1. Open notepad and copy the below text exactly as shown into the document.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<configuration> <startup useLegacyV2RuntimeActivationPolicy="true"> <supportedRuntime version="v4.0.30319"/> <supportedRuntime version="v2.0.50727"/> </startup>
</configuration>

 2. Save this document as c:\windows\System32\WindowsPowerhsell\v1.0\Powershell.exe.config
 (and/or c:\windows\System32\WindowsPowerhsell\v1.0\Powershell_ise.exe.config)
 (in addition for the 32bit Powershell on a 64bit Windows C:\Windows\SysWOW64\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\*.config)
 3. Reload powershell and type the following command: $PsVersionTable.clrVersion (It should show Major version 4 if .Net 4 is supported.)

 NAME: Get-LHSInatalledApp.ps1
 AUTHOR: u104018
 LASTEDIT: 02/06/2012 16:01:40
 KEYWORDS: Registry Redirection, Installed software, Registry64, WOW6432Node,Accessing Remote x64 Registry From an x86/x32 OS Computer

.LINK
 http://poshcode.org/3186
 http://blogs.technet.com/b/heyscriptingguy/archive/2011/11/13/use-powershell-to-quickly-find-installed-software.aspx
 http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa393067%28VS.85%29.aspx

#Requires -Version 2.0
#>

[cmdletbinding(DefaultParameterSetName = 'Default', ConfirmImpact = 'low')] 

Param(

 [Parameter(ParameterSetName='AppID', Position=0,Mandatory=$False,ValueFromPipeline=$True)]
 [Parameter(ParameterSetName='Default', Position=0,Mandatory=$False,ValueFromPipeline=$True)]
 [string[]] $ComputerName=$ENV:COMPUTERNAME,

 [Parameter(ParameterSetName='AppID', Position=1)]
 [String] $AppID = "*",

 [Parameter(ParameterSetName='Default', Position=1)]
 [String] $AppName = "*",

 [Parameter(ParameterSetName='Default', Position=2)]
 [String] $Publisher = "*",

 [Parameter(ParameterSetName='Default', Position=3)]
 [String] $Version = "*"

 )

BEGIN {
 ${CmdletName} = $Pscmdlet.MyInvocation.MyCommand.Name

 If (!($PsVersionTable.clrVersion.Major -ge 4)) {Write-Error "Requires .Net 4.0 support for Powershell 2.0"; Return} 

} # end BEGIN

PROCESS {
 #Write-Verbose -Message "${CmdletName}: Starting Process Block"
 ForEach ($Computer in $ComputerName) {
 Write-Verbose "`$Computer contains $Computer"
 IF (Test-Connection -ComputerName $Computer -Count 2 -Quiet) {
 try { 

 Write-Verbose "Get Architechture Type of the system"
 $OSArch = (Get-WMIObject -ComputerName $Computer win32_operatingSystem -ErrorAction Stop).OSArchitecture
 if ($OSArch -like "*64*") {$Architectures = @("32bit","64bit")}
 else {$Architectures = @("32bit")}
 #Create an array to capture program objects.
 $arApplications = @()
 foreach ($Architecture in $Architectures){
 #We have a 64bit machine, get the 32 bit software.
 if ($Architecture -like "*64*"){
 #Define the entry point to the registry.
 $strSubKey = "SOFTWARE\\WOW6432Node\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Uninstall"
 $SoftArchitecture = "32bit"
 $RegViewEnum = [Microsoft.Win32.RegistryView]::Registry64
 }
 #We have a 32bit machine, use the 32bit registry provider.
 elseif ($Architectures -notcontains "64bit"){
 #Define the entry point to the registry.
 $strSubKey = "SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Uninstall"
 $SoftArchitecture = "32bit"
 $RegViewEnum = [Microsoft.Win32.RegistryView]::Registry32
 }
 #We have "64bit" in our array, capture the 64bit software.
 else{
 #Define the entry point to the registry.
 $strSubKey = "SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Uninstall"
 $SoftArchitecture = "64bit"
 $RegViewEnum = [Microsoft.Win32.RegistryView]::Registry64
 }

 Write-Verbose "Create a remote registry connection to the Computer."
 $Reg = [Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey]::OpenRemoteBaseKey('LocalMachine', $Computer, $RegViewEnum)
 $RegKey = $Reg.OpenSubKey($strSubKey)

 Write-Verbose "Get all subkeys that exist in the entry point."
 $RegSubKeys = $RegKey.GetSubKeyNames() 

 Write-Debug "Architecture : $Architecture"
 Write-Debug "SoftArchitecture : $SoftArchitecture"
 Write-Verbose "Enumerate the subkeys."
 foreach ($SubKey in $RegSubKeys)
 {
 Write-Debug "`$SubKey : $SubKey"
 $Program = $Reg.OpenSubKey("$strSubKey\\$SubKey")
 $strDisplayName = $Program.GetValue("DisplayName")
 if ($strDisplayName -eq $NULL) { continue } # skip entry if empty display name

 switch ($PsCmdlet.ParameterSetName)
 { 

 "AppID" { if ((split-path $SubKey -leaf) -like $AppID)
 {
 $RegKey = ("HKLM\$strSubKey\$SubKey").replace("\\","\")

 $output = new-object PSObject
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "ComputerName" -value $computer
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "RegKey" -value ($RegKey) # useful when debugging
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "AppID" -value (split-path $SubKey -leaf)
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "AppName" -value $strDisplayName
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "Publisher" -value $Program.GetValue("Publisher")
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "Version" -value $Program.GetValue("DisplayVersion")
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "Architecture" -value $SoftArchitecture
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "UninstallString" -value $Program.GetValue("UninstallString")
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "InstallDate" -value $Program.GetValue("InstallDate")

 $output
 } #end if
 } #end "AppID"

 "Default" { If (( $strDisplayName -like $AppName ) -and (
 $Program.GetValue("Publisher") -like $Publisher ) -and (
 $Program.GetValue("DisplayVersion") -like $Version ))
 {
 $RegKey = ("HKLM\$strSubKey\$SubKey").replace("\\","\")

 $output = new-object PSObject
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "ComputerName" -value $computer
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "RegKey" -value ($RegKey) # useful when debugging
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "AppID" -value (split-path $SubKey -leaf)
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "AppName" -value $strDisplayName
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "Publisher" -value $Program.GetValue("Publisher")
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "Version" -value $Program.GetValue("DisplayVersion")
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "Architecture" -value $SoftArchitecture
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "UninstallString" -value $Program.GetValue("UninstallString")
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "InstallDate" -value $Program.GetValue("InstallDate")

 $output
 } #end if
 } #end "Default"
 } #end switch

 } # end foreach ($SubKey in $RegSubKeys)
 } # end foreach ($Architecture in $Architectures)
 } Catch {
 write-error $_
 }
 } Else {
 Write-Warning "\\$Computer DO NOT reply to ping"
 } # end IF (Test-Connection -ComputerName $Computer -count 2 -quiet)
 } # end ForEach ($Computer in $computerName)

} # end PROCESS

END { Write-Verbose "Function ${CmdletName} finished." }

} # end Function Get-LHSInatalledApp

function Log
{
 [cmdletbinding()]
 param (
 [Parameter(Position=1,Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipeline=$true)]
 [string]$text,
 [Parameter(Position=0,Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipeline=$False)]
 [string]$filename
 )
 begin
 {
 Write-Debug 'Logging starting'
 Write-Debug "Filename: $($filename)"
 }
 process
 {
 foreach ($txt in $text)
 {
 Out-File $filename -append -noclobber -inputobject $txt -encoding ASCII
 Write-Verbose $txt
 }

 }

 end
 {
 Write-Debug 'Logging ending'
 }

}

function ExitWithCode
{
 param
 ($exitcode)

 Write-Verbose "Ending with $($ExitCode)"
 $host.SetShouldExit($exitcode)
 exit
}

function Remove-InstalledMSI
{
 [cmdletbinding()]
 param (
 [Parameter(Position=0,Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipeline=$True,ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName)]
 [ValidatePattern('\{.+\}')]
 [Alias('AppID')]
 [string]$ProductCode = $null,
 [Parameter(Position=1,Mandatory=$false,ValueFromPipeline=$False)]
 [string]$LogFilePath,
 [Parameter(Position=1,Mandatory=$false,ValueFromPipeline=$False)]
 [string]$Property
 )

 begin
 {
 Write-Verbose 'Start of Remove-InstallMSI'
 $exitcode = $null
 } 

 process
 {

 foreach ($pc in $ProductCode)
 {
 Write-Verbose "Uninstall ProductCode: $($pc)"
 $AppName = $((Get-LHSInstalledApp -AppID $pc).AppName)
 Write-Verbose "AppName: $($AppName)"
 if ($LogFilePath -ne $null)
 {
 $LogFilePath = "c:\windows\TEMP\AP_UNINSTALL_$($AppName).log"
 }
 else
 {
 Write-verbose "LogFilePath: $LogFilePath"
 }
 $argumentlist = "/x $pc /qn REBOOT=ReallySuppress /lv `"$($LogFilePath)`" "
 $argumentlist += $Property
 Write-Verbose "Argument List: $($argumentlist)" 

 $exitcode = (Start-Process -filepath "msiexec.exe" -ArgumentList $argumentlist -Wait -PassThru).ExitCode
 Write-Verbose "Exit Code: $($exitcode)"

 $output = new-object PSObject
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "ProductCode" -value $pc
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "AppName" -value $AppName
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "ExitCode" -value $($ExitCode)
 $output | add-member NoteProperty "LogFilePath" -value $LogFilePath

 $output
 }

 }

 end
 {
 Write-Verbose 'End of Remove-InstallMSI'
 }

}

$logfile = "$env:windir\temp\AP_$($ApplicationName)_Removal.log"
Write-Verbose "Logfile: $($logfile)"
try { Remove-Item $logfile -force -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue }
catch { Write-Warning $_ }

log $logfile '--------------------------------------------'
log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($ApplicationName) - Removal Started"
log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($ApplicationName) - Searching for $($PublisherName) $($ApplicationName)"
 if ($IgnoreInstallDate -eq $true)
 {
 Write-Verbose "IgnoreInstallDate set $($IgnoreInstallDate)"
 log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($ApplicationName) - Ignoring installation date"
 }
 else
 {
 Write-Verbose "IgnoreInstallDate set $($IgnoreInstallDate)"
 log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($ApplicationName) - Removal only if install date is more than $($InstallDateOlder) days ago"
 }

if ($PublisherName)
{

 $applist = Get-LHSInstalledApp -AppName "*$($ApplicationName)*" -Publisher "*$($PublisherName)*"
}
else
{
 $applist = Get-LHSInstalledApp -AppName "*$($ApplicationName)*"
}

log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($ApplicationName) - Found $($applist.Count) $($ApplicationName) installations"
log $logfile '--------------------------------------------'
$applist | foreach { write-verbose "AppName: $($_.AppName)"}
$ReturnValue = 0
Write-Verbose "Current Exit Code: $($ReturnValue)"

$applist | where {$_.appid -notmatch ('\{.+\}') } | foreach { log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($_.AppName) has no productcode" }
$applist = $applist | where {$_.appid -match ('\{.+\}') } 

if ($IgnoreInstallDate -eq $true)
{
 $uninstall = $applist | Remove-InstalledMSI
}
else
{
 $uninstall = $applist | where-object { ($_.InstallDate -notin ($null,'')) -and`
 ( ((get-date) - (Convert-DateString -Date $($_.InstallDate) -Format 'yyyyMMdd')).days -gt $InstallDateOlder ) }`
 | Remove-InstalledMSI
}

$uninstall | foreach { log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($_.AppName) - Exit Code: $($_.ExitCode)" ; $returnvalue += $_.exitcode }

log $logfile '--------------------------------------------'
log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($ApplicationName) - Removal Finished"

ExitWithCode($ReturnValue)

 

 

 

Computer cleanup – Ask removal

Got a lot of computers with the Ask-suite of toolbars installed? When users are allowed administrative permissions on their end-points this is a likely scenario – here is a minor script bit that will cleanup the computer from the hassle.

First – retrieve the Get-LHSInstInstalledApp function from the Technet Gallery. Its a very well written function to retrieve information about both 32-bit and 64-bit applications installed within a Windows environment – great for retrieving information about the installed applications on a computer.

I am not certain if I wrote the Log function on my own, or if this is just something that I grabbed from a script someone previously wrote. If you did write it – just give a shout!

 

Running the script requires admin permissions

 

function Log
{
param([string]$filename,[string]$text)
Out-File $filename -append -noclobber -inputobject $text -encoding ASCII
}
$logfile = "$env:windir\temp\SMS_Ask_Removal.log"
Remove-Item $logfile -force
log $logfile "$(get-date) - Ask Removal Started"

$ask = Get-LHSInstalledApp -AppName *Ask* -Publisher "APN, LLC"

log $logfile "$(get-date) - Found $($ask.Count) Ask installations"

Foreach ($install in $ask)
{
log $logfile "--------------------------------------------"
log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($install.AppName) found"
try
{
log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($install.AppName) removal"
$exitcode = (Start-Process -filepath "msiexec.exe" -ArgumentList "/x $($install.appid) /qn REBOOT=ReallySuppress /lv `"c:\windows\TEMP\UNINSTALL_$($install.AppName).log`"" -Wait -PassThru).ExitCode
log $logfile "$(get-date) - $($install.AppName) - return code: $exitcode"
}
catch
{
log $logfile "$(get-date) - ERROR: $($install.AppName) removal failed"
}

}

log $logfile "--------------------------------------------"
log $logfile "$(get-date) - Ask Removal Finished" 

 

 

 

MSI EXIT CODE 1935

If the Windows Installer engine fails with a generic exit code of 1935 – I usually spent a few hours troubleshooting the machine in pure nerdy interest. Here are a few tips gathered to save myself and hopefully someone else time.

Quite often the issue lies that you are chasing a red-herring. The error code you may get back is either a generic access denied or a file not found. Reviewing all the activity with Process Monitor quite seldom gives any direct hints as there are numerous red herrings that will lead one astray.

After 1h tracking this particular issue – gathering ones thoughts for the future seemed the easiest.

ERROR:Error 1935.An error occurred during the installation of assembly 'Microsoft.VC80.ATL,type="win32",version="8.0.50727.42",publicKeyToken="1fc8b3b9a1e18e3b",processorArchitecture="amd64"'

 

In order of preference – try the following

Ensure that the folder C:\WINDOWS\WINSXS\TEMP and C:\WINDOWS\WINSXS\INSTALLTEMP exist and that the administrative group aswell as the system account has full access to it.

Run SFC /SCANNOW

Similiar posts;

One of possible solutions to: Visual C++ 2008 Redistributable installation error 1935 with HRESULT 0x8007005

Error 1935 when you try to install Microsoft Office 2010 or 2007

Troubleshooting 1935 and 2908 errors during installation

Symantec Endpoint Protection 12.X on OSX

If you are using ConfigMgr 2012 (or one of the plugins hi-jacking the infrastructure – such as Parallels) to manage the Mac OSX devices there are some caveats to the ordinary guide of both from Symantec on howto install the Symantec Endpoint Protection aswell as the Microsoft guide “How to Create and Deploy Applications for Mac Computers in Configuration Manager”.

First of all you need access to the Symantec Endpoint Protection media and to actually start the installation. Once its started you can immediately headover to Symantecs guide on howto Deploy (keyword deploy) SEP with Apple Remote Desktop or Casper.

The guide states that once the installation is fired up (and you acknowledge that its OK if this requires you to restart the computer) you can access the Tools-menu

image

Clicking the “Create remote deployment package” will immediately fire off a new menu that will allow you to choose a file-name and a place where the new package can be saved.

image

Once the deployment package is created you you will receive a helpful note about only deploying this with a deployment system, and remembering to restart afterwards.

image

As per the ConfigMgr article on howto deploy applications for Mac there is a need to convert the generic PKG-format to the ConfigMgr compatible (and unique) CMMAC format.

This specific package does unfortunately not provide any detection mechanism, so the command-line to convert this package is.

./CMApputil –c SEPRemote.pkg –o /volumes/usbstick/ -s

-c points the utility to our original package

-o points to the where we want to place our final package (named SEPRemote.cmmac)

-s will omit the creation of the detection rules

WMI Hotfixes for Windows 7 x64

##################################################
WMI
##################################################
You cannot overwrite an exported event log file by using the Wevtutil.exe tool in Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, and Windows Server 2012
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2797789/en-us
Files Updated:
Wevtsvc.dll
6.1.7601.22213
1,650,176
09-Jan-2013

Profile loading takes a long time due to full DFS namespace sync with PDC
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2915094/en-us

Files Updated:
Profprov.dll
6.1.7601.22575
33,792
18-Jan-2014

Profsvc.dll
6.1.7601.22575
225,280
18-Jan-2014

Profsvc.ptxml
Not applicable
648
13-Jul-2009

Userprofilewmiprovider.mof
Not applicable
10,708
13-Jul-2009

High memory usage by the Svchost.exe process after you install Windows Management Framework 3.0 on a Windows-based computer
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2889748
Files Updated:
Wmidcprv.dll
6.2.9200.16398
180,736
04-Jul-2013

Wmiprvsd.dll
6.2.9200.16706
724,992
26-Sep-2013

Wmiprvse.exe
6.2.9200.16398
432,128
04-Jul-2013

Wmidcprv.dll
6.2.9200.16398
180,736
09-Jul-2013

Wmiprvsd.dll
6.2.9200.20813
724,992
26-Sep-2013

Wmiprvse.exe
6.2.9200.16398
432,128
09-Jul-2013

Wmidcprv.dll
6.2.9200.16398
129,536
26-Sep-2013

Wmiprvse.exe
6.2.9200.16398
328,704
26-Sep-2013

Wmidcprv.dll
6.2.9200.16398
129,536
26-Sep-2013

Wmiprvse.exe
6.2.9200.16398
328,704

An update that prevents a “0xC0000034” error message when you try to install Windows 7 SP1, Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, or Windows Embedded Standard 7 SP1 is available
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2533552/en-us
Alot of files are updated

Forwarded events cannot be displayed in Event Viewer on a Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2-based computer
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2794427/en-us
Files Updated:
Wevtsvc.dll
6.1.7601.22213
1,650,176
09-Jan-2013

Wmiprvse.exe process crashes when you run a WMI script on a computer that is running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2833001/en-us
Files Updated:
Cimwin32.dll
6.1.7601.22296
2,059,264
10-Apr-2013

Unexpectedly slow startup or logon process in Windows Server 2008 R2 or in Windows 7
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2617858
Files Updated:
Repdrvfs.dll
6.1.7601.21824
453,632
21-Sep-2011

An application or service that queries information about a failover cluster by using the WMI provider may experience low performance or a time-out exception
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/974930
Files Updated:
Clussvc.exe
6.1.7600.20517
4,579,840
28-Aug-2009

Cluswmi.dll
6.1.7600.20517
540,160
28-Aug-2009

Cluswmi.mof
Not Applicable
76,540
28-Aug-2009

Cluswmiuninstall.mof
Not Applicable
176
13-Jul-2009

Visual Studio 2013 silent install

Visual Studio 2013 is now available through Microsoft Volume Licensing Website, and can also be downloaded through Developer Network.

Directly from the Visual Studio-website you can find all editions with the latest Update 3 slipstreamed into a single media, however if you visit the Microsoft Volume Licensing Website there is only the RTM version of Visual Studio 2013 available. The major difference between the Visual Studio-website and the MVLS-website is that the license is embedded within the downloaded media you retrieve from MVLS. The files available from Visual Studio-website is a 90-day trial version. If you press the Key-option at MVLS no product key is presented to you.

So, if you want to deploy Visual Studio 2013 with the latest (or any) update? Do the following!

Downloaded Visual Studio 2013. Technically we are not interested in the bits, but when the download is started a product key is generated with the download link

Downloaded the latest ISO-file from the edition of Visual Studio 2013 (Professional perhaps?)

image

Once the ISO-files is downloaded (weighs in at about 6gb), extract the file.

Do not read the guide from Developer Network on howto deploy Visual Studio in an unattended manner (well, ok – if you really want to). Instead start the vs_<edition>.exe file with a question mark. Like this

vs_professional.exe /? 

The following output is generated;

Setup - Usage

This setup supports the following switches:

/Help              Display this usage text.
/H
/?

/Quiet             Quiet mode with no display and no user interaction.
/Q
/Silent
/S

/Passive           Display progress but do not wait for user input.

/PromptRestart     Prompt the user before restarting the system.

/NoRestart         Do not restart during or after installation.

/ForceRestart      Always restart the system after installation.

/Log               <filename> Specifies a location for the log file.
/L

/Uninstall         Uninstall the product.
/U

/Uninstall /Force  Uninstall the product and features shared with other
products.
/U /Force          Warning: using this switch may cause other products i
nstalled on this machine to stop functioning properly.

/Repair            Repair the product.

/Layout            Create a copy of the media in specified folder.

/NoRefresh         Prevent setup checking for updates from the internet.

/NoWeb             Prevent setup downloading from the internet.

/Full              Install all product features.

/AdminFile         <filename> Specifies the installation control file.

/AddRemoveFeatures Choose which features to add or remove from the insta
lled product.

/CustomInstallPath <path>
Set Custom install location

/ProductKey        <25-character product key>
Set custom product key (no dashes)

For more information see <a href="http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=376912&c">http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=376912&c</a>
lcid=0x409 

A sample command-line for silent install would be;

vs_professional.exe /Q /S /LOG %SYSTEMROOT%\TEMP\VS_2013_U3.log /NoWeb /NoRefresh /Full /ProductKey XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXX

Office 365 / 2013 and App-V – Exclude apps

With the latest release (June 5) of Office Deployment Tool there is the ability to exclude applications when creating a package. For example, if you don’t want to deploy – say Lync? – even though you are technically licensed for it.

How does it work?

Create your XML-file

The XML defines what product you want to deploy / create an App-V package for.

A reference can be found on Technet, with the entire list of all applications that can be excluded. Do note that each application you want to exclude is a new line within the XML-file

image

<Configuration>

<Add SourcePath="c:\media\" OfficeClientEdition="32" >
<Product ID="O365ProPlusRetail">
<Language ID="en-us" />
<ExcludeApp ID="Access" />
<ExcludeApp ID="InfoPath" />
<ExcludeApp ID="Lync" />
</Product>
</Add>
<Display Level="None" AcceptEULA="TRUE" />
<Property Name="AUTOACTIVATE" Value="1" />
</Configuration>

Run the command-line

Download source media;

 setup.exe /download c:\media\configuration.xml

Create the App-V package;

setup.exe /packager c:\media\configuration.xml c:\media\package

Now you have a package!

Just to deploy!

Remember, Office is only supported to be deployed as a global package when using App-V

 

Read more about this on Technet!